Impact of INJUSTICE (Cont’d)

In a private screening of the film the Attorney General Lord Goldsmith was challenged to meet with the families. As time progressed it became clear that the Government was unwilling to reopen the cases featured within Injustice.

Without such a commitment from the Attorney General any review would become another attempt to silence the families.

Channel 4 Television Headquarters, In spite of the enormous success of the film with UK broadcasters, have refused to show it. Channel 4 have claimed that Injustice “raises important issues but could not be broadcast without the serious risk of attracting a number of indefensible libel actions from police officers.”

The BBC, after holding onto the film for five years recently stated that the film is out of date, this is despite the fact that every family in the film continue to fight for justice.

“It is our firm opinion that it is a matter of public interest that the film is broadcast in the UK.”

“The social movement that has been generated by the film is evidence of the power of cinema. Change can come through collective determination and as film makers we have tried to play a part in that process.

“This feeling is reflected towards the end of the film by Myrna Simpson whose daughter, Joy Gardner, died in police custody 28th of July 1993 “It’s important for people to fight for justice and don’t stop because there is no other way to get justice but to fight for it, and I am still fighting for justice for Joy and not only for Joy, as I say always but for all. I am fighting for justice for everyone that has been unjustly killed.”

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Related Reviews:

Spiked Liberties
(August 2001)
Why has a documentary film about deaths in police custody been chased out of cinemas across the UK?

The Guardian
(September 2002)
Ken Fero and Tariq Mehmood’s documentary – downbeat in manner, polemical in effect – tells a harrowing story.

The BBC
(March 2002)
A film that focuses on deaths in UK police custody has been seen by MEPs concerned with human rights.

Socialist Worker
(March 2004)
Around 150 people attended a showing of the film Injustice at the Prince Charles cinema in central London last week. The powerful film shows families in Britain who have been fighting for justice after their loved ones died in police custody.

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