Black women political prisoners of the police state

police batonsource: BayView News
published: 25 May 2019

The Rev. Joy Powell says she was “raped, railroaded and bamboozled” by police. Her crime? Being a poor Black woman who faced off against the police – protesting their violent brutality against Black people in Rochester, N.Y. Once she defied them, she was warned, then targeted and framed for serious crimes.

A few weeks ago, Australian Julian Assange was forcibly dragged from his political asylum to face the American police state. His crime? Like Rev. Powell, he dared to tell the truth about the violence and brutality that define American society.

Scottish political analyst Jon Wight, citing the treatment of American political prisoners Leonard Peltier and Mumia Abu Jamal, calls the U.S. “justice” system the “most cruel and callous in the world.” That system does not tolerate the exposure of its war crimes and abuses of its police state quietly – it retaliates against those who expose its injustice by treating them to cruel and callous punishment.

Black women who have confronted the abuses of America’s white authority have suffered its punishment throughout our history. Anarchist Lucy Parsons, born in 1853, is one of the few Black women mentioned in labor histories – usually as the wife of the martyred Albert Parsons, who was executed in the wake of Chicago’s Haymarket Riot of 1886.

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